Charleston Area Therapeutic Riding

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Charleston Area Therapeutic Riding

A nonverbal child is motivated to speak his first words. A wounded military veteran regains strength and lost mobility from a horse’s steady gait. A special education student gets much-needed exercise and acquires new motor skills.

Charleston Area Therapeutic Riding (CATR) is the Lowcountry’s oldest nationally accredited therapeutic horseback riding center. Since 1991 the organization has provided hundreds of riding sessions for children and adults with disabilities. Founded by horsewomen Meta Carter and Eileen McGuffie, CATR has grown from a handful of private students to teaching over 150 students a year. Under the leadership of Executive Director Murray Neale, the organization also partners with six to eight public schools a year, working with countless children with disabilities who would not otherwise have access to this specialized therapy.

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Neale, who has spent her career working in therapeutic riding, explains the benefit of a horse’s movement for a physically disabled person. “The horse’s gait moves the pelvis with the same movement as walking and stimulates an upright posture. The four legs provide a rotational component—steady and rhythmic.” Astride the back of a horse,

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Captain Sams | A Walkabout with Mark Permar

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You have to respond to the existing system rather than trying to change it. What’s exciting to me is gently integrating a neighborhood into an environment like this. It should be seamless with the natural environment.

It is a sunny day in mid-October, just five days after Hurricane Matthew has ripped through the Carolinas, a category one storm by the time it reached the Lowcountry but still enough wind and water to flood homes and take out power lines.

But today the sun is bright and hot. Children play in the ocean and sunbathers lounge along the shore at Beachwalker Park. Mark Permar pulls his Defender slowly onto the beach, and we drive a while in silence, taking in the scene.

I think we are in the middle of a swarm of butterflies.

Sure enough, countless fluttering monarchs are slowly, haltingly making their way south. The effect is mesmerizing, something out of Alice in Wonderland. The sun so bright, the air so clear, and all these flashing butterfly wings.

We pull onto a high area of soft sand, and Mark cuts the engine.

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Tim Hussey | Artist in Residence

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You can get stuck in a trap of copying yourself, giving your audience what you think they want to see. You do something and there’s something divine in it and you’re rewarded for it, so you try to copy that. But you can’t do that. You have to continuously push. That’s why there are certain eras in my work. I start getting comfortable with a particular thing, and then it’s painting for painting’s sake and not actual expression

Tim Hussey is speaking to a group of fifteen at the Cassique Clubhouse on a breezy fall day. He is thoughtful, trying to articulate the very heart of his work, his process. Hussey is the inaugural Artist-in-Residence on Kiawah and sets the standard high.

When I break new ground people don’t always get it at first. But those are often my favorite pieces—the ones that were the beginning of something new that aren’t necessarily crowd pleasers.

A Charleston native, Hussey came up with the likes of renowned artists Shepard Fairey and Jill Hooper, and he attended the Rhode Island School of Design and Parsons Paris. He has lived in New York, Los Angeles,

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A Round for the First Tee

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It’s a beautiful fall day on the River Course. A crowd of fifty fans out behind a foursome striding down the 14th fairway. Russell Henley, Ben Martin, Charles Frost, and Phillip Mollica are competing in a match play to benefit The First Tee, an international youth development program that puts young kids on the golf course. Each player has been paired with a First Tee caddy, and between holes kids get to walk with the players, ask questions, and even practice their swings. For the kids, it’s a dream. And the serious golf enthusiasts show up, too, here to see the pros up close, without PGA crowds. The afternoon is an exhibition of sorts. Each player wears a mic so the audience can hear strategy, and a bit of friendly banter. The Kiawah Island Club will make a $100 donation for every birdie, $500 for every eagle.

Henley and Martin are top earners on the Tour and PGA Ambassadors for the Kiawah Island Club. Today Martin is paired with his golf coach and friend, Charles Frost. Frost is the pro at the River Course and recently played in the PGA Championship at Whistling Straits. Henley is paired with an old friend,

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Artist In Residence | Jessie Peterson

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Over the Martin Luther King, Jr. weekend Club Members are invited to experience an intimate weekend with the Club’s second Artist in Residence, Jessie Peterson!

Artist Seminar | January 16 | River Course Club House, 1:30pm – 3:30pm

Artist Reception | January 17 | River Course Club House, 4pm – 6pm 

Born in 1984, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

Artist Jessie Peterson is a young artist quickly grabbing the attention of collectors. Her modern composition and scale stands in juxtaposition to a yearning nostalgia for the calm and tranquility of the Sea Islands where she was raised. Peterson’s paintings reflect an ability to capture natural Southern light and weave it into portrayals of Island life, evoking a certain romance for the South’s rich and layered history.

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A Conversation with Charles Frost

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Charles Frost

Head Club Professional – The River Course, Kiawah Island

L: You are playing the PGA Championship this week! Has this been a long time coming?

CF: This is a part of my profession that I enjoy. Playing in tournaments and events is how I spend my recreational time, kind of my hobby—while also being an important part of my career. So any of these situations that I’m lucky enough to get into seem like icing on the cake.

L: How did it feel when you knew you had qualified?

CF: I finished 10th in the National Club Pro Championship which was at the Philadelphia Cricket Club at the end of June. The top 20 club pros go to the Championship. I thought I had to make a put on the last hole to qualify. It turned out that I didn’t! When it was over there was a feeling of relief for the first hour. Then it turned into excitement and jubilation. Because I was just on the border of making it. It’s a life long dream accomplished! Then it turned into Oh my god I’ve got to play this golf course.

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Charleston to the Flâneur

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Charleston Author Margaret Thornton explores a city she loves and the institutions that define it.

In my novel Charleston (Ecco), the main character Eliza Poinsett spends much of her time walking and biking around Charleston, sometimes with her boyfriend Henry Heyward and sometimes alone. She is in some ways aflâneuse” – if I may appropriate and feminize the term most associated with Charles Baudelaire and Walter Benjamin – a passionate spectator who strolls a city landscape. What Eliza reveals to us as she walks around Charleston is that the institutions a community preserves tells you much about who it is.

Charleston is often referred to as the Holy City, and what I didn’t realize, despite having grown up in Charleston, is just how many churches it has. Toward the end of my novel, Eliza who finds comfort in the bells of St. Michael’s, counts, as a way of distracting herself, all of the churches south of Calhoun Street – fifteen – twelve of which are south of George Street – quite a remarkable number compared to a Renaissance Catholic town of similar size.

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Megan Phillips

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Where did you and Jordan meet?

Jordan and I are both from North Carolina and we met in college at UNC Chapel Hill. We were friends there but never dated. We reconnected again when we were both living in Charlotte and we’ve been married for two years.

So tell me a little bit about what you do?

I work for a social media start up named House Account. It’s based out of Charlotte, NC but I am able to work from home or Kiawah. It’s a shopping application that promotes small boutiques and shopping local. Charleston is all about shopping local so I think it works well for me to be here!

You made the move down to Charleston and Kiawah a little over a year ago. What was that like?

Amazing. We are so excited and honored to live in such special communities. I grew up coming to Kiawah with my family. We would come every year in the spring or summer and rent a house. I vividly remember biking to the Ocean Course or the Straw Market to get ice cream as a little girl.

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Locavores

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What a difference a decade makes.

In a move revolutionary for private clubs at the time, The Kiawah Island Club enlisted a top New York chef to consult in the opening of its signature restaurant in 2000. On the heels of winning the James Beard Foundation’s “Best Chef, New York” Award, and on the eve of opening his flagship Craft Restaurant, Tom Colicchio teamed up with the Club’s Executive Chef, Doug Blair, in the creation of Voysey’s Restaurant at Cassique. This inspired collaboration set a precedent for five-star talent merging with five-star amenities across the American private club landscape.

In the years since, a multitude of major changes have transformed Colicchio’s career, elevated the Club lifestyle, and prompted an evolution in culinary practices. For his part, Colicchio and his restaurant empire have rocketed to international acclaim. His presence on the “Top Chef” series helped bolster Bravo TV ratings to staggering numbers, and a string of coveted culinary awards have been added to his portfolio. The Kiawah Island Club has grown impressively, both in services, and amenity offerings. And even the American palate, always curious but fickle, has developed a taste for something new, embracing all things local.

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